The website of the Health Estate Journal

Ensuring the best UPS system performance

Alex Emms, Operations director at Kohler Uninterruptible Power, highlights some of the key priorities for healthcare engineering teams to consider to ensure that hospitals and other healthcare facilities have safe, efficient, and compliant UPS system

One topic of universal concern that has been created by the COVID-19 pandemic is the pressure being felt by healthcare staff of all disciplines. While risking their own safety and working in demanding conditions, they also have the constant worry of being overwhelmed if admission rates increase exponentially. Power problems can occur anywhere, anytime, in any electrical system, regardless of the design standards employed. Accordingly, it may be tempting to build in the highest possible resilience across an entire healthcare estate to avoid any risk to patient safety or business continuity arising from a power loss. However, realworld budgetary or space constraints typically make this approach unrealistic. In developing or reviewing policies to support critical life-supporting equipment, and other less obviously critical, yet still essential, equipment, healthcare estate managers should consider the guidelines set out in the Department of Health’s Health Technical Memorandum (HTM) 06-01 guidance, Electrical Services supply and distribution document. It details how to design in solutions that carefully balance each area’s critical resiliency needs against costs.

HTM 06-01 in more detail

HTM 06-01 is a component of the Government’s Health Technical Memoranda, which provide comprehensive advice and guidance on the specialised building and engineering technology used in healthcare delivery. The design process should verify that single points of failure leading to loss of electricity supply are minimised by providing the appropriate level of resilience at the point of use. HTM 06-01 defines three power supplies for use across a healthcare estate: primary, typically from the energy supply company – this is supplemented by a secondary supply, such as a generator or batteries, and tertiary power supply, in the form of a UPS or battery system, which constitutes a further supplement. The HTM considers two aspects of risk arising from a power outage:

Log in or register FREE to read the rest

This story is Premium Content and is only available to registered users. Please log in at the top of the page to view the full text. If you don't already have an account, please register with us completely free of charge.
Register

Upcoming Events

The Fire Safety Event

NEC, Birmingham
25th - 27th April 2023

Facilities Show

ExCeL London
16th - 18th May

NAHFO Conference 2023

Crowne Plaza, Stratford-upon-Avon
5th - 7th June 2023

Healthcare Estates

Manchester Central
10th - 11th October 2023

Access the latest issue of Health Estate Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Health Estate Journal app from your device's App store

Upcoming Events

The Fire Safety Event

NEC, Birmingham
25th - 27th April 2023

Facilities Show

ExCeL London
16th - 18th May

NAHFO Conference 2023

Crowne Plaza, Stratford-upon-Avon
5th - 7th June 2023

Healthcare Estates

Manchester Central
10th - 11th October 2023

Access the latest issue of Health Estate Journal on your mobile device together with an archive of back issues.

Download the FREE Health Estate Journal app from your device's App store

Step Communications Ltd, Step House, North Farm Road, Tunbridge Wells, Kent TN2 3DR
Tel: 01892 779999 Fax: 01892 616177
www.step-communications.com
© 2023 Step Communications Ltd. Registered in England. Registration Number 3893025